EPA Implements New Rules for Hazardous Waste Generators

June 1, 2017

EPA Implements New Rules for Hazardous Waste Generators

New Jersey and Pennsylvania have adopted the EPA’s Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule. This revised rule for hazardous waste generators became effective May 30, 2017 for states that do not have an EPA authorized RCRA program (Iowa and Alaska) and for states (such as New Jersey and Pennsylvania) that have adopted the rule by reference.

  • Other Authorized States run the RCRA program in their state and, thus, will go through the state adoption & authorization process for this new RCRA rule. Authorized states will have to pick up the more stringent provisions, typically by July 1, 2018 (or July 1, 2019 if state law change is needed).

What Does This Mean to Your Site’s Operations?

  • The new rule allows for Very Small (formally “Conditionally Exempt Small”) and Small Quantity Generators (SQG) to have an episodic increase in hazardous waste production without resulting in a change in hazardous waste generator status. There are notification, marking, labeling, storage, and recordkeeping requirements associated with this provision.
  • Additional notification requirements are in effect for Small and Large Quantity Generators.
  • In addition to determining the type of waste that has been generated, hazardous waste generators will have to determine the physical and health hazards of the waste. Hazardous waste container marking requirements include identifying the physical and health hazards of the waste.

Key changes to the Hazardous Waste Generators requirements:

  • Reorganization of the regulatory requirements placing all of the generator requirements in 40 CFR Part 262. The regulation has been reorganized, and the rules are easier to find.
  • New for Small Quantity Generators
    • Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) will now be designated as a Very Small Quantity Generator (VSQG).
    • Creation of the “episodic event” provision which allows SQG and VSQG to generate a volume of waste (that would have previously moved them to a higher-level generator category) with certain limitations. The generator category would not change as a result of an “episodic event”. Note: An increase in production resulting in an increase of waste generation does not qualify as an “episodic event”.
    • VSQG under the ownership of a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) may transport their waste to the LQG for disposal. Note – there are DOT requirements and NJDEP hazardous waste transporter requirements which are not considered as part of this ruling.
    • New rules require SQG’s to submit a notification to the EPA every 4 years beginning in 2021. The notification serves as verification that the SQG is still in operation.
  • New for Large Quantity Generators
    • LQG’s need to notify the EPA or their authorized state if the facility is closing.
    • LQG’s must create and submit a Contingency Plan quick reference guide for emergency responders. The content requirements are found in 40 CFR 260.262. Note: LQG’s with existing Contingency Plans do not need to create a quick reference guide until the next Contingency Plan revision.
  • Hazardous waste container markings requirements now include identification of the hazards of the contents (this can be accomplished with GHS markings and/or DOT markings) in addition to marking as “Hazardous Waste”.

Clarifications to the Hazardous Waste Generators requirements:

  • 3-day rule for moving waste in Satellite Accumulation Areas to a Central Accumulation Area has been clarified to mean 3 calendar days.
  • New rules clarify that a hazardous waste generator can only have one generator category per month. If an activity makes a generator a LQG at a given moment, they are a LQG for the entire month.
  • New rules clarify that solid and hazardous waste determinations must be made at the point of generation before any dilution, mixing, or other alteration of the waste occurs.
  • Storage areas for hazardous waste that do not meet the definition of satellite accumulation areas are called “central accumulation areas” (CAA). The new rules clarify that there can be more than on CAA and that “central” does not mean that it is in the center of the facility.
  • New rules clarify that SQGs and LQGs must identify the RCRA waste code(s) associated with their waste. Hazardous waste determination has always been a requirement for generators; however, many relied on disposal vendor to identify the waste code. The new rules clarify that this is a requirement of the hazardous waste generator.

HOW CAN EMILCOTT HELP?

Emilcott can assist with getting your operation aligned with the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Final Rule. Every day Emilcott’s experienced professionals help hazardous waste generators understand the new requirements, and how the rule affects their operations. This is your opportunity to learn more about what you can do to comply with the new rule.

Emilcott can provide a broad range of technical support related to RCRA Compliance:

  • Training: Client-needs specific training for site-wide RCRA Awareness for waste generators and shipment manifest signers.
  • Program Development: Update site programs and implementation methods to reflect new requirements.
  • Prepare RCRA Regulatory Submissions: Biennial Reports, Notifications, and Status Updates
  • Gap Assessments: Identify potential gaps in compliance related to program implementation or operational changes.

Please give us a call – we can help you meet your goals!